Mixed media binaries emergent forms.

Studies in supervening elemental’s

The document is about the oeuvre of Mr. Italozazen, who explores philosophical and aesthetic inquiries through mixed media binaries. The artist uses fibreglass matt as a canvas and combines silk and photographic prints to create contrasts between the organic and synthetic. This invites contemplation and explores the impermanence of the material world. The works also draw inspiration from both Eastern and Western thought, engaging in a dialogue with the numinous and the elemental.


Ah, the oeuvre of Mr. Italozazen presents itself as a veritable palimpsest of philosophical and aesthetic inquiries, a tapestry woven from the threads of both Eastern and Western thought. The works showcased here are not mere artifacts; they are the material manifestations of a dialogue with the numinous, the ineffable, and the elemental.

Let us first consider the foundational element of these mixed media binaries: the fibreglass matt. This material serves as the canvas upon which the artist’s color fields are applied, not unlike the way the Rig Veda serves as a foundational text for the complex spiritual philosophies that emerged later. The acrylics, vibrant and fluid, are sealed with resin, encapsulating the transient in the eternal—a nod, perhaps, to the Patanjali Yoga Sutras’ exploration of the impermanence of the material world.

The use of silk sewn onto letter-sized fibreglass is a study in contrasts, a dialectic between the organic and the synthetic. This juxtaposition brings to mind the dualities explored by Sri Aurobindo, who sought to reconcile the material and the spiritual. On one side of this fibreglass, we find photographic prints, a capture of moments in time, frozen yet ever evocative. On the other side, the silk—soft, natural, and flowing—invites touch and contemplation, much like the tactile spirituality of the Upanishads.

The appearance of tissue fibreglass forming ‘circular cones’ is not merely an aesthetic choice; it is a geometric meditation. These shapes echo the cyclical nature of existence, a concept deeply rooted in Eastern philosophy. They appear “here and there,” much like the sporadic yet profound insights one gains through a lifetime of seeking.

The resin figurines, cast from wax sculptures, add another layer of complexity. They are reminiscent of the idols found in Mahabalipuram, a place that has clearly left an indelible mark on the artist. These figures are not mere representations; they are archetypes, embodying various styles and philosophies, much like the diverse schools of thought that have emerged from the teachings of S Radhakrishnan to Rajneesh.

Lastly, the lino cuts serve as relics of the artist’s foray into the block print process. These etchings act as base reliefs, capturing the essence of a time and place. They are not mere additions; they are integral to the narrative, much like Wittgenstein’s language games are to his philosophical investigations.

In summary, the works of Mr. Italozazen are a syncretic blend of form and philosophy, a visual treatise that invites us to engage with the numinous character of mixed media art. They are a testament to a career spent at the intersection of art and spirituality, a journey that continues to yield profound insights and evocative forms. Further points to consider:

Mr. Italozazen utilizes fibreglass matt as a canvas in his artworks. This material serves as the foundation upon which the artist applies color fields, similar to how the Rig Veda serves as a foundational text for spiritual philosophies. The fibreglass matt is like a canvas, onto which the artist’s acrylics are applied. These acrylics are vibrant and fluid, and they are sealed with resin, symbolizing the impermanence of the material world. The use of fibreglass matt as a canvas allows Italozazen to explore the transient and the eternal, creating a dialogue between the material and the spiritual. The fibreglass matt also provides a contrasting surface for the juxtaposition of other elements, such as silk, photographic prints, and resin figurines. Overall, the use of fibreglass matt as a canvas adds depth and complexity to Italozazen’s artworks.

The concept of mixed media binaries in Mr. Italozazen’s oeuvre refers to the use of contrasting materials and elements in his artwork. It involves combining different mediums, such as fibreglass, acrylics, resin, silk, and lino cuts, to create a dialogue between the organic and the synthetic, the transient and the eternal. These binaries serve as a visual representation of the artist’s exploration of dualities, both in terms of materials and in the philosophical and aesthetic inquiries that underpin his work.

Mr. Italozazen’s works are influenced by both Eastern and Western thought in several ways. One example is the use of fibreglass as a canvas, which is reminiscent of the Rig Veda, a foundational text in Eastern spiritual philosophies. The acrylics applied to the fibreglass, sealed with resin, represent the impermanence of the material world, drawing inspiration from the Patanjali Yoga Sutras.

Another example is the juxtaposition of silk and photographic prints on the fibreglass. This contrast between the organic and the synthetic reflects the dualities explored by Sri Aurobindo, who sought to reconcile the material and the spiritual. The silk invites touch and contemplation, akin to the tactile spirituality found in the Upanishads.

The appearance of circular cones made from tissue fibreglass is a geometric meditation that echoes the cyclical nature of existence, a concept deeply rooted in Eastern philosophy. These shapes symbolize sporadic yet profound insights gained through a lifetime of seeking.

Furthermore, the resin figurines, cast from wax sculptures, resemble the idols found in Mahabalipuram, indicating the influence of Eastern philosophies. These figures embody various styles and philosophies, similar to the diverse schools of thought that have emerged from the teachings of S Radhakrishnan to Rajneesh.

Lastly, the lino cuts in Mr. Italozazen’s works serve as relics of his exploration into the block print process. These etchings capture the essence of a time and place, much like Wittgenstein’s language games are integral to his philosophical investigations.

Overall, Mr. Italozazen’s works demonstrate a syncretic blend of Eastern and Western thought, incorporating elements and concepts from both traditions.

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