A BK RAJA YOGA life (reflections: 1984 to 1989)

life as a raj yogi

Summary of facts

Life as a Brahma kumari yogi

Summary of highlights.

How did the author use performance art to advocate for peace as a Brahma Kumari yogi?

As a Brahma Kumari yogi, the author advocated for peace through performance art. They used visual arts and street theatre as a medium to engage with the public and convey the essence of their spiritual journey. The author stood before the world, displaying large posters that represented their philosophical exploration and promoted peace. They also shared the wisdom they gained through meditation and discussions at the Gold Coast center, fostering community bonds and inner growth. Through these artistic and communal activities, the author actively advocated for peace as a Brahma Kumari yogi.

Can you provide more information about the significance of the Gold Coast center in fostering inner growth and community bonds?

As a Brahma Kumari yogi, the author advocated for peace through performance art. They used visual arts and street theatre as a medium to engage with the public and convey the essence of their spiritual journey. The author stood before the world, displaying large posters that represented their philosophical exploration and promoted peace. They also shared the wisdom they gained through meditation and discussions at the Gold Coast center, fostering community bonds and inner growth. Through these artistic and communal activities, the author actively advocated for peace as a Brahma Kumari yogi.

What are the historic connections between the Brahma Kumaris and British India mentioned in the document?

The document mentions the historic connections of the Brahma Kumaris to British India. These connections add depth to the author’s journey as a BK Raja Yogi. The fusion of Western imagination with the foundations of Classical Indian Metaphysics embodies the syncretism encountered in the author’s readings.

Narrative context.

In the tapestry of life, I found myself walking the path of a Brahma Kumari yogi, where the art of performance became the canvas on which I painted my spiritual journey. Much like a philosopher navigating the intricacies of existence, I embarked on a quest that intertwined the realms of belief and self-identity.

At the heart of the Brahma Kumaris, there was a profound sense of performance, a performance in two distinct dimensions. Firstly, it was about belonging to a new religious movement, a fascinating subject for analysis. Secondly, it was the personal performance of one’s identity, a deeply subjective exploration. These elements gave shape to my spiritual odyssey, much like a philosopher dissecting the essence of truth.

The theory of the soul, as taught by the BK Raja Yogis, was elegantly simple—a tiny point of light at the core of our being. This concept sparked an intellectual fire within me. If I am not the body, could I exist in a realm beyond this physical world? The quest for answers led me down the labyrinthine path of dualism, echoing the philosophical inquiries of great thinkers like Bertrand Russell.

Yet, as an artist, I sought not just to unravel these ideas but to exhibit them through the visual arts. Performance art became my medium to engage with the public, a living expression of my life as a yogi and a method to advocate for peace. I stood before the world, displaying large posters that conveyed the essence of my journey. Weekly markets in the region became my stage, where I brought philosophy to life in the form of street theatre, much like a theatrical performance reminiscent of Wittgenstein’s linguistic exploration.

Life as a BK Raja Yogi was a journey of connections, both spiritual and human. The Gold Coast center provided a space for group meditation and discussions, fostering not only inner growth but also community bonds. It was here that I shared the wisdom I had gained through daily one-hour sessions, echoing the dialectical elements of philosophical discourse.

The historic connections of the BK’s to British India and their reinterpretation of the Indian tradition of caste added depth to my journey. I stood at the crossroads of history, embodying the fusion of Western imagination with the foundations of Classical Indian Metaphysics, much like the syncretism I encountered in my readings.

Authenticity was a thread that ran through my experience. Donning Indian-style attire for functions, teachings, and poster exhibitions, I felt a profound sense of belonging and connection with the group. It was an integral aspect of the performance art that constituted the million minutes of peace, a tangible expression of my philosophical explorations.

Yet, at its core, my journey as a BK Raja Yogi was about integration—an ethical vision grounded in revelation. The fusion of Western ideals with the profound insights of classical Hindu cosmic cycles painted a unique canvas of spirituality, echoing the philosophical inquiries of scholars like Thomas Nagel. It was a journey that transcended borders, both geographical and philosophical, a revelatory exploration of the mind and the world.

In the hallowed pre-dawn stillness, I, Mr. Italozazen, would awaken to the day when the world was yet in slumber, at the auspicious hour of Brahma Muhurta, to partake in the sacred ritual of group meditation. This daily rite was a silent symphony, a confluence of souls in search of the divine, each breath a step closer to the ultimate reality, each moment a deeper communion with the cosmic consciousness.

As the first rays of the sun painted the sky with hues of gold, I immersed myself in the ancient wisdom of sacred texts, their verses unfurling like lotus petals at the touch of light. This was not merely a reading; it was an act of reverence, a daily pilgrimage to the heart of spirituality, where each word resonated with the vibrations of the eternal truth.

With the setting sun as my backdrop, I would then share the profound tranquility of meditation with eager souls, disseminating the pearls of peace to those yearning for solace. This dissemination was not just teaching; it was an offering of the self, a sharing of the profound inner silence that I had cultivated.

Amidst the ebb and flow of the day, my hands would shape the earth as a landscaper, each seed sown a metaphor for the seeds of spirituality I planted in the hearts of others. This labor was my yajna, a sacrifice to gather the means for my pilgrimage to the hallowed grounds of the BK World Spiritual University at Mount Abu, a journey to the zenith of spiritual learning.

My weeks were punctuated with exhibitions of teachings, a wandering minstrel of divine knowledge, traversing the landscapes of northern New South Wales to the vibrant shores of Queensland’s Gold Coast. These exhibitions were my art, my philosophy in motion, a tapestry of teachings woven from the threads of Raja Yoga.

Thus, my life as a Brahma Kumari yogi was a living philosophy, a quest not unlike the sages of yore, a journey through the Upanishadic forests of exploration, revelation, and authenticity. In this grand tapestry of existence, my path echoed the footsteps of the great philosophers, a testament to the timeless quest for the ultimate truth.

 Save as PDF