GAZE ON NATURE

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Overview A cultural reader and Animal spirits.

A humanistic paradigm

The works ‘a gaze on nature’ grapple with issues related to environmental philosophy surveyed in the link provided through a pigawary. Do rational agents have intrinsic rights over natural objects? The cultural reader (image above) depicts the notion of a rational agent set most likely in an academic profile. However the ‘animal spirits’ surround in the form of various human contortions as classic yogic mortification postures. The notion of animal spirits derives from early modern philosophy, most notably Descartes famous treat known as the meditations on first philosophy.

A ecological paradigm

A gaze on nature takes on ecology through the lens of anthropomorphic forms. The reason in part is stems from the logic of the human perception within an objective content world. Science in its empirical image is counter intuitive to the manifest image. The image of a termite mound used in the artworks is an example of a clash between the scientific and manifest world views.

Sellars distinguishes the two world views by placing the manifest image as thoughts, intensions, appearances, as opposed to the scientific image that is marked by notions of causalities, and theories of particles and forces

Wilfrid Stalker Sellars “Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man”

So the ecological paradigm as a gaze on nature can be from two distinct points of view. Each view come to radically distinct conclusions.

Classic world views

The works have two sides that reflect on some points of metaphysics. So the crumbling Buddha fragments behind the cultural reader are about the encroaching natural world on the rational order that became a feature of what was known as ‘the enlightenment period’. The other piece has an figurative resemblance of non human on a human form that references the manifest image as a primordial sense of the world which continually challenges the scientific image of reality.